Deadly Beauty; The Common Plants That Can Kill Your Dog

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One of my favourite signs that Spring is upon us is the beautiful sight of bright yellow daffodils. They currently seem to be everywhere; filling my garden, brightening up the park, even dotted along the hedgerow of our regular walk. However, they hide a sinister and deadly secret… one that you may not be aware of but one that could make your dog very ill; yes we’re talking about POISON!

Daffodils ūüĆľ are not the only ones nor the worst, you may be surprised by just how many of the common plants and flowers we have in our gardens pose a potential risk of making your beloved pet very ill or in some cases, can even cause organ failure and death.

This doesn’t mean you need to rip up every flower in your garden but act with caution and always supervise your dog if there’s a chance they could eat one of these plants. You may be reading this and thinking it’s unlikely, but a poll completed by cat and dog insurers, More Than, recorded that 1 in 12 pets have eaten poisonous plants or flowers with almost half of these becoming ill enough to require medical attention and 15% tragically died. Small dogs and puppies are particularly at risk due to their playful, curious nature and their size.

In June 2015, to highlight this problem, the Gardener and dog lover, Charlie Dimmock, helped plant the aptly named ‚ÄúPoisonous Pawtanical Garden‚ÄĚ at the Horniman Museum, South London and although pets were banned for obvious reasons, their owners were encouraged to visit and learn about which plants are and aren‚Äôt safe for pets. Some important advise worth remembering was that while planting your garden, please don‚Äôt leave any bulbs around which your dog could pick up and chew as these have the highest concentration of the compounds which will make your dog ill.

 

On the Danger List Tomato plants

Apart from the humble Daffodil, other common plants such as begonias, clematis, dahlias,  geraniums, lobelia and marigolds and dozens of  other common flowers, shrubs and trees, are potentially poisonous when eaten by cats and dogs. The list also includes climbing plants such as clematis, ivy and wisteria, as well cottage garden favourites such as verbena, chrysanthemums and delphiniums and many colourful bedding plants and some garden fruits and vegetables such as the tomato plant. The tomato plant is also known as the Lycopersicon spp and is in the Solanaceae family of plants, the same family as deadly nightshade. The green parts of the plant, including the leaves and stems, contain ingredients called glycoalkaloids, which are toxic to cats and dogs if ingested.

Different plant poisons require very specific first aid.

Plant poisoning is a¬†veterinary emergency that requires immediate medical attention; if you see your dog exhibit any of these symptoms¬†you should suspect some type of poisoning and take immediate action to try and identify what your dog has eaten. Look for chewed plants and check your dog’s mouth for evidence¬†to help you identify a culprit

  1. Hypersalivation
  2. Vomiting
  3. Lack of appetite
  4. Diarrhea Dizziness
  5. Weakness Leg paralysis
  6. Signs of impaired vision
  7. Abnormally slow heartbeat (bradycardia)
  8. Hypotension Shortness of breath
  9. (dyspnea) Depression
  10. Seizures Coma

Your first point of call should be your vet. If it’s after hours then this is a good link to find a 24 hour vet.¬†https://www.vets-now.com/find-an-emergency-vet¬†puppies are at greater risk of dying so please take immediate action.

There’s also a specialist poison hotline which is open 24 hours a day but unfortunately¬†isn’t UK based so¬†calls will cost ¬£20 from 8am to 8pm on Monday to Friday (excluding Bank Holidays), and ¬£30 outside these hours, expensive, but if you are desperate for help then at least its a option. Their¬†number¬†for¬†the UK is¬†¬†02073055055¬†¬†If you’re reading this and know of a better helpline then please comment and we will update the post to make the site better for everyone.

What Action To Take

The advice on the emergency first aid that you can administer yourself whilst you wait for help will be either:

  • To induce vomiting,¬†OR
  • To give milk or water to wash out the mouth, neutralise the poison and/or dilute the toxicity.

BUT, making the pet vomit the wrong poisonous plant could make a serious situation even more deadly, so you MUST know what to do for each type of plant and obviously your first port of call is to carefully identify the plant your dog has eaten.

For These Plants You Should Induce Vomiting

The following is a list of some of the most dangerous plants and symptoms of poisoning. If you see your puppy eat these plants, the advice is to make him vomit right away, but in all cases take the advice of a Vet first. Be aware that these plants have many varieties and subspecies, each plant we have named is the most common variety but each one links to its own Wikipedia page to further help you identify the right plant and take the appropriate action.

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Toxic Plants Garden Plants, Identification, Symptoms and Action in The Case Of Ingestion By Dogs.

Induce Vomiting; A list of the most common plants that are toxic to dog's when you defiantly should make your dog sick as theirs a risk of death.
Plant NamePhoto IDSymptomsAction
YewMuscle weakness, difficulty breathing, dilated pupils, sudden DEATH without warning.Induce Vomiting
English IvyThirst, vomiting and diarrhea, stomach pain, DEATH in one to two days.Induce Vomiting
Crown Of ThornsDepression, bloody diarrhea, fast or slow heart rate, stomach pain,Coma,DEATH in one two days.Induce Vomiting
Fox GloveDepression, bloody diarrhea, fast or slow heart rate, stomach pain,Coma,DEATHInduce Vomiting
Larks SpurDepression, bloody diarrhea, fast or slow heart rate, stomach pain,Coma,DEATHInduce Vomiting
Lilly of the ValleyDepression, bloody diarrhea, fast or slow heart rate, stomach pain,Coma,DEATHInduce Vomiting
Monks BaneDepression, bloody diarrhea, fast or slow heart rate, stomach pain,Coma,DEATHInduce Vomiting
OleanderDepression, bloody diarrhea, fast or slow heart rate, stomach pain,Coma,DEATHInduce Vomiting
Deadly NightshadeRed and dry skin, fever,seizures, thirst, dilated pupils.DEATHInduce Vomiting
DaturaRed and dry skin, fever,seizures, thirst, dilated pupils.DEATHInduce Vomiting
HerbaneRed and dry skin, fever,seizures, thirst, dilated pupils.DEATHInduce Vomiting
JasmineRed and dry skin, fever,seizures, thirst, dilated pupils.DEATHInduce Vomiting
Jimson Weed (Devils Snare)Red and dry skin, fever,seizures, thirst, dilated pupils.DEATHInduce Vomiting
DafodilsDepression, violent vomitingInduce Vomiting
TulipsTulipDepression, violent vomitingInduce Vomiting
Wisteria (bulbs)Depression, violent vomitingInduce Vomiting
HollyStomach pain, vomiting, and diarrhea.Induce Vomiting
Lilly'sExcess urination and drinking as kidney failInduce Vomiting
MistletoeVomiting, diarrhea, slowed breathing and heart rate.Induce Vomiting
RubarbVomiting, drooling, stomach pain, convulsions, kidney damage.Induce Vomiting

How do I make my dog vomit?
There are two products commonly found in the home that can help induce vomiting, 3 percent Hydrogen Peroxide or good old table salt. The general rule for peroxide is 5mls (or 1 teaspoon) per 10 pounds, orally. Repeat every 15-20 minutes, up to three times, until the animal vomits. Care must be taken, as aspiration into the lungs of the resulting foam can cause pneumonia.

For some dogs peroxide works within seconds of administering so be sure to give outside or in an area that is easy to clean.

While peroxide is the preferred “inducer”, in a pinch, a teaspoon of table salt applied to the far recesses of the throat will also bring up the desired results, but DO NOT USE SALT WATER its extremely dangerous to make an animal drink salt water you could kill them or cause further complications

Do NOT Induce Vomiting with these plants.

With these plant poisons, vomiting may make the problems worse. Instead, if you see the puppy eat these plants, give lots of water or milk to dilute the poison and to wash and coat the stomach.

Toxic Plants Where You Shouldn't Induce Vomiting In Your Dog

Toxic plants, help with identification, symptoms ,recommend actions and emergency links for expert help.
Plant NameIdentificationSymptomsActions
AzaleaVomiting, diarrhoea, seizures, coma and deathDO NOT Induce Vomiting
CaladiumTongue and throat swells, difficult breathing.DO NOT Induce Vomiting
DieffenbachiaTongue and throat swells, difficult breathing.Do Not Induce Vomiting
PhilodendronTongue and throat swells, difficult breathing.Do Not Induce Vomiting
Snake Plant ( Mother In Laws Tongue)Mouth irritation to collapse.Do Not Induce Vomiting
Jerusalem CherryVomiting, bloody diarrhoea, trembling, weakness.ANTIDOTE is available from your vet, see as soon as possible and Do Not Induce Vomiting
Nightshade ( don't confuse with deadly nightshade)Vomiting, bloody diarrhea, trembling, weakness.ANTIDOTE is available from your vet, see as soon as possible and Do Not Induce Vomiting
Potatoes, Green Parts and EyesVomiting, bloody diarrhoea, trembling, weakness.ANTIDOTE is available from your vet, see as soon as possible and Do Not Induce Vomiting

My Dogs Stopped Breathing

Be ready to administer CPR if your dog stops breathing call your veterinarian or an animal poison control centre for accurate advice but below is a link to a guide with pictures and a video of the correct technique .Click Here 

* This article is for general informational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be providing medical advice and is not a substitute for such advice. The reader should always consult a health care provider concerning any medical condition or treatment plan. Neither Find My Lost Dog  nor the author assumes any responsibility or liability with respect to use of any information contained herein.

What Is Safe To Plant?

Here’s a few suggestions below, the best advice is to subscribe to our page and download our PDF guide to toxic plants, take this with you to a garden centre and ask advice from the staff, many of the plants in our list will have sub variety’s we haven’t listed ( there’s too many) so its best to check. Note that the labels on plants will often have a guide to whats toxic but they will be referring to humans here not our furry friends

Sunflowers-Doggy Safe

Sunflowers are Pet Friendly
Fuchsia Dog Safe
Gerberas Dog Safe
African daisies are safe but don’t confuse with the standard British daisies which are poisonous
Busy Lizzies are Dog Safe too

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